MBTI sketching paper for ideation

At Concept7 we developed our own MBTI sketching paper for ideation sessions. It helps you think inside the box of 4 personality traits. You can download it here for free.

At Concept7 we developed our own MBTI sketching paper for ideation sessions. It helps you think inside the box of 4 personality traits. You can download it here for free.

MBTI sketching paper A4 Pdf 340Kb
MBTI sketching paper A3 Pdf 336Kb
MBTI sketching paper Letter Pdf 340Kb
MBTI sketching paper Legal Pdf 336Kb

You can describe a design challenge on every piece of sketching paper which represents the problem you want to solve. There’s also some space for annotations.

Design for all buying modalities

The sketching paper helps you think from all buying modalities’ point of view. The paper contains a matrix in which you find an axis with a line from quick decision making to slow decision making and an axis with a line from rational decision making to emotional decision making. Every corner of the matrix represents a buying modility (personality trait).

Competitive

The competitive type is a someone who is a quick decision maker and bases his decision on factual information.

Spontaneous

The spontaneous type is a someone who is a quick decision maker and bases his decision on feelings.

Methodical

The methodical type is a someone who is a slow decision maker and bases his decision on factual information.

Humanistic

The humanistic type is a someone who is a slow decision maker and bases his decision on feelings.

No stereotyping

Interesting reads

Unfortunately these sources are available in Dutch only.

Don’t see a personality trait as a single individual. You’re never only a competitive person, only some people are in some situations more competitive than others are. It could very well be that someone is at some moment a more methodical type, but when this person realizes he’s in a hurry he can turn more competitive because his situation pushes him in that direction.

The above doesn’t really matter here, because during ideation we DO want to solve problems for all of the personality traits.

Sources

Sceencast: Does your site appeal to all buying modes?

5 Replies

  1. Amy Lamp

    Thanks for sharing these! I can’t wait to use them on our next project. I also appreciate your note about solving problems for all personality traits. I’m new to this idea of designing for the four personality traits, but am excited about learning more.

  2. Saqib Ali

    Can you please provide some real-world example of MBTI sketching paper in use?

    Thanks
    Saqib

  3. Andy Budd

    Actually, I’d be interested in seeing how you use these templates as well. The division seems well suited for describing different user scenarios or sketching user flows or smaller UI elements that satisfy these modes of interactivity. However they don’t seem suited for sketching whole interfaces. So I’d be interested in know when, where and how you utilise them.

  4. Eric

    Exactly what Andy Budd said.

    They sound really really handy for certain scenarios, but I have a feeling I’m going to download them, then never wind up using them.

  5. Henk Wijnholds

    @saqib, @andy, @eric: I’m glad you guys ask. We use these templates during cocreation sessions with our clients. It’s sometimes hard to get people involved during such sessions when there’s no framework as a starting point. Indeed, we use user scenarios (or design challenges) as input for this. Sometimes (especially when improving an existing website) a sitemap can help making it even easier to come up with ideas: ‘Let’s solve this problem on this page’. You’ll see the template will be a starting point and once the creative juices get flowing people won’t stick so tightly to the framework anymore. It’s main purpose is to inspire and get people started. A great deal of its power lies in its simplicity. This way it’s easy to learn to design from an extreme user’s point of view.

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